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Quayola has created a new multi-screen video-installation to be premiered on the 7-9th October 2011, at the renowned Palais des Beaux Arts in Lille, France’s second museum after the Louvre, as the opening of their 2011-2012 season. An exclusive password protected excerpt is available for you to watch here. Quayola's mesmerising piece, Strata#4, is part of his on-going series of films, prints and site-specific installations for the project devised to challenge accepted perceptions of classical art, architecture and iconography. 

Using a series of paintings from the Palais des Beaux Arts' Flemish collection and specifically focusing on the Rubens grand altarpieces, Strata #4 strips away the outer layers of dramatic symbolism from the masterpieces and explores the world beneath their figurative skins. Quayola uses custom software to decode the rules present in the proportion, composition and colour of each painting, defining colour palettes, patterns and structures, and generating new abstract geometries following those very same rules. Strata #4 describes the journey from the original masterpieces to contemporary digital abstractions, transforming from a recognisable reality into a colour-saturated and calculated fabrication, pulsing and mutating in a stunning sequence of geometric formations.

Launching at the Palais des Beaux Arts in Lille on 7th October, Strata #4 will be shown as a large-scale diptych installation located in the atrium alongside the related original paintings used in the film.

Produced by Nexus Interactive Arts
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Transforming Perfection: Quayola's Geometric Digital Artscapes

Quayola is a visual artist whose work explores the patterns and geometries that lie inherent in music and artistic traditions like architecture and painting. Using custom software he creates stunning visuals that reveal the hidden structures embedded in both electronic music and culturally weighty artifacts like baroque Roman churches, Gothic French cathedrals, or Flemish paintings. These are expressed in a variety of mediums from video, audio, photography, installation, live performance, and print.

In his Strata series, a deconstruction of iconic artworks reveals the frameworks and shapes that lurk beneath their exteriors. By breaking them down using algorithmic techniques and transforming the works into mutating colored polygons, he builds shimmering digital canvases where he can reinterpret the art and create something new.

TCP visited his east London studio to talk about his work, his influences, and get a fascinating glimpse into his working methods.
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